Petal Pushers Farm


Great gardens start at Petal Pushers Farm in Laconia NH. Let us know if you have any questions you'd like our educated staff to research for you and we'll give you the answers!

Open Mon-Sat 9-5
Sundays 10-3
603-524-7253
www.facebook.com/petalpushersfarm
http://www.petalpushersfarm.com/
Zucchini that looks like this photo here seems like a dream, or out of a store. Especially when the Zucchini/Summer Squash in your garden looks like this:

This was a localized problem in the New Hampshire area last year due to the heavy and constant rains. Not sure what the forecast is this year, but we want to give you some tips on how to prevent what Iowa State University calls:
Blossom End Rot Causes/Solutions:
1. CAUSE: Calcium Deficiency: When the soil doesn’t have a good calcium level or there is uneven moisture for the plant to take up the calcium provided (zucchinis LOVE consistent moisture) Calcium is important to the vegetable in the process of cell growth. 
1. SOLUTION: Make sure you are rotating your crops and amending your soil with compost every year. The nutrients in your soil gets used up by each crop cycle, and an organic compost helps replace the nutrients for that years crop. To add more calcium use a form of Epsom salts or Magnesium Sulfate. Just mix in a table spoon or two to your compost when amending your soil. But make sure whatever fertilizer you use doesn’t have a high amount of nitrogen in it!
….
2. CAUSE: Inconsistent water/humidity 
As mentioned before, your zucchinis love to have CONSISTENT moisture. But if it’s too moist, fungus can grow and cause damage to the blossoms, and eventually your crop. This was a main cause for the New Hampshire area last year with all the rain we had. This year is looking dry so check your plants often, but don’t over water.


2. SOLUTION: When your plants start to blossom take a layer of mulch (we have four different types: Red Cedar, Hemlock, Natural Pine, and Black, and we deliver!)  and place it under the plant and around where the leaves spread to keep the moisture in the soil and off of your blossoms. If you are already seeing blossom rot, dead head those blossoms so the fungus doesn’t spread. And if it’s on your vegetables cut the infected area off and save the wrest of your vegetable. There will be a small scar, but it’s still edible. 


…..

3. CAUSE: All about what ya’ mamma told ya: the flowers and the bees: aka insufficient natural pollination from insects. A customer told us there have been fewer bees in her area, and if you don’t see insects buzzing around your blossoms in the morning, when the zucchini blossoms are opened the most, you might have the same problem.


3. SOLUTION: This link http://www.ehow.com/how_5204927_prevent-zucchini-squash-hand-pollinating.html is an amazing tutorial on how to pollinate your zucchini plants by hand. Read up my friend.



Helpful hint for the day from this lesson: love your garden. You reap what you sow. And if you sow seeds of love you’ll reap a bountiful harvest.

Happy Planting and we at Petal Pushers wish every one a great Easter Weekend!
-KA

Zucchini that looks like this photo here seems like a dream, or out of a store. Especially when the Zucchini/Summer Squash in your garden looks like this:

This was a localized problem in the New Hampshire area last year due to the heavy and constant rains. Not sure what the forecast is this year, but we want to give you some tips on how to prevent what Iowa State University calls:

Blossom End Rot Causes/Solutions:

1. CAUSE: Calcium Deficiency: When the soil doesn’t have a good calcium level or there is uneven moisture for the plant to take up the calcium provided (zucchinis LOVE consistent moisture) Calcium is important to the vegetable in the process of cell growth. 

  • 1. SOLUTION: Make sure you are rotating your crops and amending your soil with compost every year. The nutrients in your soil gets used up by each crop cycle, and an organic compost helps replace the nutrients for that years crop. To add more calcium use a form of Epsom salts or Magnesium Sulfate. Just mix in a table spoon or two to your compost when amending your soil. But make sure whatever fertilizer you use doesn’t have a high amount of nitrogen in it!

….

2. CAUSE: Inconsistent water/humidity 
As mentioned before, your zucchinis love to have CONSISTENT moisture. But if it’s too moist, fungus can grow and cause damage to the blossoms, and eventually your crop. This was a main cause for the New Hampshire area last year with all the rain we had. This year is looking dry so check your plants often, but don’t over water.
  • 2. SOLUTION: When your plants start to blossom take a layer of mulch (we have four different types: Red Cedar, Hemlock, Natural Pine, and Black, and we deliver!)  and place it under the plant and around where the leaves spread to keep the moisture in the soil and off of your blossoms. If you are already seeing blossom rot, dead head those blossoms so the fungus doesn’t spread. And if it’s on your vegetables cut the infected area off and save the wrest of your vegetable. There will be a small scar, but it’s still edible. 
…..
3. CAUSE: All about what ya’ mamma told ya: the flowers and the bees: aka insufficient natural pollination from insects. A customer told us there have been fewer bees in her area, and if you don’t see insects buzzing around your blossoms in the morning, when the zucchini blossoms are opened the most, you might have the same problem.
Helpful hint for the day from this lesson: love your garden. You reap what you sow. And if you sow seeds of love you’ll reap a bountiful harvest.
Happy Planting and we at Petal Pushers wish every one a great Easter Weekend!
-KA