Petal Pushers Farm


Great gardens start at Petal Pushers Farm in Laconia NH. Let us know if you have any questions you'd like our educated staff to research for you and we'll give you the answers!

Open Mon-Sat 9-5
Sundays 10-3
603-524-7253
www.facebook.com/petalpushersfarm
http://www.petalpushersfarm.com/

Problems With Peppers…

Peppers… there are alot of colors and varieties, and so many wonderful ways to cook them!

But peppers are notorious for being rather difficult to grow. But I have gathered some helpful tips that will make producing pretty peppers perfectly prime.

~Peppers are best if started from seed in the winter and transplanted outside. But if you got any from us in either 6 packs or the 4” pots, they’re farther along - which is a great advantage for you!

~Peppers do not like cold/wet soil - which with this weather is not a good sign for us.. Anything below 55-50 degrees will not be comfortable for them, this can result in a discoloration of the foliage or a loss of blossom growth. If you have them planted in a raised bed then you have an advantage because the soil actually stays warmer in the raised bed.

~ Peppers need decent spacing when being planted, but when they’re bigger they prefer to be touching other pepper plants - called “holding hands” as they grow.

~During the dry season pay extra attention to your pepper plants, they like to have good moist soil.

~Speaking of soil, make sure you’re fertilizing the soil you place the plants in. You cannot over fertilize these plants - just make sure you use more magnesium than nitrogen. One girl made her own recipe to add to her organic top soil and her plant is covered in fruit! She just mixed in peat moss, egg shells, bone meal, and coffee grounds into her top soil.

A common problem with growing peppers is that the plant will be dark and have plenty of foliage and blossoms - but no fruit. This is quite the dilemma but here are some reasons why it happens:

~too much nitrogen in the soil - you can balance that out by adding more magnesium to the soil, peppers really love it. Here’s the recipe:

            2 Tablespoons of Epsom Salt per 1 gallon of water

            One pint per plant as blossoms appear - every two weeks.

~different weather conditions cause a defect in fruit growth as well. Cold nights will not help, as discussed early. Another one can be dry winds and warm nights (above 70 degrees).

~If the foliage is a deep green it’s because that’s where all the nutrients is going. Add some magnesium to the soil, and see if that changes.

~Last suggestion is pollination: if the pepper blossoms are not being pollinated by insects they won’t produce as much fruit - but this is the least common reasoning.

If you are reading this and know of anything else, let us know! We love to learn and share information with others.


Don’t forget to come see what we have in stock for our pepper plants!

Open Monday - Saturday 9-5:30 / Sundays 10-3

(603) 524-7253

-Keep Calm and Garden On!

-KA

HERB GARDEN!

Having a garden is a wonderful thing. But some times you live in a small apartment with no yard, or perhaps don’t always feel like running out back to get what you need.

A great idea is a herb garden by your kitchen window!

Herb box!

Start with any length window box, whatever will fit in the area you want it - but make sure it’s an area that gets alot of sun - if not all day sun at least afternoon sun.

Make sure that the window box has drainage holes in the bottom, and then use a piece of landscape cloth or burlap to cover them. To keep the boxes light weight use lightweight potting mix rather than potting soil (we have bags of Pro-mix, which is perfect!)

For placement in your box, use a great assortment, but keep them about 6 inches apart to leave room for root growth and adequate nutrition from the soil. 

One herb that’s a bit of a loner is any mint variety because they tend to go wild and take over. Which is a good thing for the plentiful amount of mint you’ll have but it bothers the other herbs.

We have a wide variety of herbs for you to chose from for your window box, here’s the list of what you’ll need and you can purchase it all here at Petal Pushers!

HERBS GALORE:

Basil - classic king basil, necessary for any one who enjoys food tasting good!
Sage - green, green/purple, green/purple/white variegated - dries well!
Chives - add a subtle onion spice to any dish, even the blossoms are good to use!
Lavender - make ice cream, use as aroma therapy, or in a salad! Wonderful to dry
Rosemary - two varieties, same great taste - chicken, pot roast, you name it.
Thyme - my favorite, we have lemon thyme as well.
Oregano - golden, spicy, and variegated. Delicious especially for those Italiano’ dishes!
Dill - my favorite with lemon on salmon, and we only have 2 left!
Cilantro- classic in Asian or Mexican dishes, looks like parsley but tastes better
Parsley - Great for decor on dishes to make ‘em fancy. 
Winter Savory - great on poultry and egg dishes. Great combined with parsley and onions!
Lemon Balm - from the mint family, great in iced tea, hot tea, fruit cups, or salads
Marjoram - i just learned about this one: the leaves are good with veal, liver, herb butter, on roast beef sandwiches, egg dishes, poultry stuffing, soups. They add new flavor to potato salad, creamed potatoes, and string beans.

For the mint varieties that like to fly solo and go crazy:
Mint - great addition to those tasty mojitos
Peppermint - tea any one? Think outside the box with this delicious little one.

We have several sizes of window boxes, in different colors too. We carry 16 oz and 1 cu. ft bags of Pro-mix, which is what we recommend to use in these delicious boxes. 

We’re open 9-5:30 Monday - Saturday and Sundays 10-3. Herb supplies are limited, so get them while you can and enjoy some delicious foods.

Keep Calm and Garden On.

-KA 

We recently added to our shelves “Maxsea Plant Foods”.
We carry three different types:
All Purpose Plant Food: 16-16-16
Bloom Plant Food 3-20-20
Acid Plant Food 14-18-14
We have small 1/2 oz. samples of all three on our front counter that you can purchase for a quarter or take one for free with the purchase of a plant. So to make it easier for you to now what sample pack to try or what to purchase, I’ve made a list of what plants go with what plant food. 
Enjoy!
All Purpose Plant Food: says it all - designed for use on all plants indoors and out doors.
Bloom Plant Food: this is designed to help flowering plants, bud set, and increase blossom size
Acid Plant Food: click here for Colorado State University’s list of plants that love acid: ACID LOVING PLANTS
Keep Calm and Garden On, and don’t forget Mom this weekend!!
-KA 

We recently added to our shelves “Maxsea Plant Foods”.

We carry three different types:

  • All Purpose Plant Food: 16-16-16
  • Bloom Plant Food 3-20-20
  • Acid Plant Food 14-18-14

We have small 1/2 oz. samples of all three on our front counter that you can purchase for a quarter or take one for free with the purchase of a plant. So to make it easier for you to now what sample pack to try or what to purchase, I’ve made a list of what plants go with what plant food. 

Enjoy!

  • All Purpose Plant Food: says it all - designed for use on all plants indoors and out doors.
  • Bloom Plant Food: this is designed to help flowering plants, bud set, and increase blossom size
  • Acid Plant Food: click here for Colorado State University’s list of plants that love acid: ACID LOVING PLANTS

Keep Calm and Garden On, and don’t forget Mom this weekend!!

-KA 

Rarely do you meet someone who doesn’t love tomatoes. They’re good in salads, tomato melts, sauces, chili; so many delicious dishes require this wonderful fruit. And we want to help you grow the tomatoes that best suit your taste buds.

One good question to ask is do I grow determinate or indeterminate tomatoes? And here’s what that means:

Tomatoes are determinate when they form a flower bunch at the terminal growing point, which causes the plant to stop growing in height. Tomatoes that are indeterminate never set terminal flower clusters, rather they form lateral ones and continue to grow taller – sometimes taller than you’d expect!

Dictionary definition of determinate: (of a flowering shoot) Having the main axis ending in a flower bud and therefore no longer extending in length, as in a cyme

Determinate tomatoes are also known as “bush” tomatoes and grow on average to 3-4 feet in height. All of the tomatoes from these “bush” varieties produce fruit at the same time. This is also why you don’t want to prune or “sucker” the buds because it will reduce your crop.

Examples of determinate tomatoes are: Rutgers, Roma, Celebrity, and Marglobe.

Dictionary definition of indeterminate: (of a plant shoot) Not having all the axes terminating in a flower bud and so producing a shoot of indefinite length

Indeterminate tomatoes are also called “vining” tomatoes. They grow and grow up to the first frost and sometimes reach up to a height of 10 feet! (don’t worry, we sell tomato stakes and cages!) They will bloom, bring forth fruit, and ripen all throughout the season.

With indeterminate giants it’s good to prune and remove suckers, but it’s necessary in every region, but is recommended for the best crop.

Examples of indeterminate tomatoes are: Big Boy, Beef Master, Cherry, Early Girl, Heirloom, etc.

So now you know! And you can come down to Petal Pushers to get everything you need to start either variety of tomato. We have organic fertilizers, potting soil, and containers. We even have those cool looking Topsy Turvy containers, which are perfect for growing tomatoes on your porch and keeping little critters from eating them before you indulge in your favorite tomato dish!

 Check out this website for more details on indeterminate and determinate varieties.

Keep Calm and Garden On!

-KA

We have had alot of questions from customers on “when can I start planting?" With it being 89 degrees and people are at the beach instead of the the ski resorts - it doesn’t really feel like April. But it’s not QUITE yet time. Because we’ve been at the beach one day and bundled up the next. Welcome to New Hampshire. :)
We’ve done a little researching and found a couple websites that can be helpful when wondering when to plant what.
NH Garden Solutions this is an extensive detailed list on when to plant different vegetables. We really enjoyed the bit about the Native American “three sisters” and will be experimenting with this concept in our garden.
Lunar Phase Planting this woman wrote about her experience in mapping out a good harvest according to the moon.
UNH Cooperative Extension Sowing and transplanting, good things to know.
With the strange weather we’ve been having, it’s still good to use caution. But know that whatever it is you may need to get started we have it for you here at Petal Pushers Farm on Parade Road in Laconia!
Keep Calm and Garden On!
-KA 

We have had alot of questions from customers on “when can I start planting?" With it being 89 degrees and people are at the beach instead of the the ski resorts - it doesn’t really feel like April. But it’s not QUITE yet time. Because we’ve been at the beach one day and bundled up the next. Welcome to New Hampshire. :)

We’ve done a little researching and found a couple websites that can be helpful when wondering when to plant what.

NH Garden Solutions this is an extensive detailed list on when to plant different vegetables. We really enjoyed the bit about the Native American “three sisters” and will be experimenting with this concept in our garden.

Lunar Phase Planting this woman wrote about her experience in mapping out a good harvest according to the moon.

UNH Cooperative Extension Sowing and transplanting, good things to know.

With the strange weather we’ve been having, it’s still good to use caution. But know that whatever it is you may need to get started we have it for you here at Petal Pushers Farm on Parade Road in Laconia!

Keep Calm and Garden On!

-KA 


Zucchini that looks like this photo here seems like a dream, or out of a store. Especially when the Zucchini/Summer Squash in your garden looks like this:

This was a localized problem in the New Hampshire area last year due to the heavy and constant rains. Not sure what the forecast is this year, but we want to give you some tips on how to prevent what Iowa State University calls:
Blossom End Rot Causes/Solutions:
1. CAUSE: Calcium Deficiency: When the soil doesn’t have a good calcium level or there is uneven moisture for the plant to take up the calcium provided (zucchinis LOVE consistent moisture) Calcium is important to the vegetable in the process of cell growth. 
1. SOLUTION: Make sure you are rotating your crops and amending your soil with compost every year. The nutrients in your soil gets used up by each crop cycle, and an organic compost helps replace the nutrients for that years crop. To add more calcium use a form of Epsom salts or Magnesium Sulfate. Just mix in a table spoon or two to your compost when amending your soil. But make sure whatever fertilizer you use doesn’t have a high amount of nitrogen in it!
….
2. CAUSE: Inconsistent water/humidity 
As mentioned before, your zucchinis love to have CONSISTENT moisture. But if it’s too moist, fungus can grow and cause damage to the blossoms, and eventually your crop. This was a main cause for the New Hampshire area last year with all the rain we had. This year is looking dry so check your plants often, but don’t over water.


2. SOLUTION: When your plants start to blossom take a layer of mulch (we have four different types: Red Cedar, Hemlock, Natural Pine, and Black, and we deliver!)  and place it under the plant and around where the leaves spread to keep the moisture in the soil and off of your blossoms. If you are already seeing blossom rot, dead head those blossoms so the fungus doesn’t spread. And if it’s on your vegetables cut the infected area off and save the wrest of your vegetable. There will be a small scar, but it’s still edible. 


…..

3. CAUSE: All about what ya’ mamma told ya: the flowers and the bees: aka insufficient natural pollination from insects. A customer told us there have been fewer bees in her area, and if you don’t see insects buzzing around your blossoms in the morning, when the zucchini blossoms are opened the most, you might have the same problem.


3. SOLUTION: This link http://www.ehow.com/how_5204927_prevent-zucchini-squash-hand-pollinating.html is an amazing tutorial on how to pollinate your zucchini plants by hand. Read up my friend.



Helpful hint for the day from this lesson: love your garden. You reap what you sow. And if you sow seeds of love you’ll reap a bountiful harvest.

Happy Planting and we at Petal Pushers wish every one a great Easter Weekend!
-KA

Zucchini that looks like this photo here seems like a dream, or out of a store. Especially when the Zucchini/Summer Squash in your garden looks like this:

This was a localized problem in the New Hampshire area last year due to the heavy and constant rains. Not sure what the forecast is this year, but we want to give you some tips on how to prevent what Iowa State University calls:

Blossom End Rot Causes/Solutions:

1. CAUSE: Calcium Deficiency: When the soil doesn’t have a good calcium level or there is uneven moisture for the plant to take up the calcium provided (zucchinis LOVE consistent moisture) Calcium is important to the vegetable in the process of cell growth. 

  • 1. SOLUTION: Make sure you are rotating your crops and amending your soil with compost every year. The nutrients in your soil gets used up by each crop cycle, and an organic compost helps replace the nutrients for that years crop. To add more calcium use a form of Epsom salts or Magnesium Sulfate. Just mix in a table spoon or two to your compost when amending your soil. But make sure whatever fertilizer you use doesn’t have a high amount of nitrogen in it!

….

2. CAUSE: Inconsistent water/humidity 
As mentioned before, your zucchinis love to have CONSISTENT moisture. But if it’s too moist, fungus can grow and cause damage to the blossoms, and eventually your crop. This was a main cause for the New Hampshire area last year with all the rain we had. This year is looking dry so check your plants often, but don’t over water.
  • 2. SOLUTION: When your plants start to blossom take a layer of mulch (we have four different types: Red Cedar, Hemlock, Natural Pine, and Black, and we deliver!)  and place it under the plant and around where the leaves spread to keep the moisture in the soil and off of your blossoms. If you are already seeing blossom rot, dead head those blossoms so the fungus doesn’t spread. And if it’s on your vegetables cut the infected area off and save the wrest of your vegetable. There will be a small scar, but it’s still edible. 
…..
3. CAUSE: All about what ya’ mamma told ya: the flowers and the bees: aka insufficient natural pollination from insects. A customer told us there have been fewer bees in her area, and if you don’t see insects buzzing around your blossoms in the morning, when the zucchini blossoms are opened the most, you might have the same problem.
Helpful hint for the day from this lesson: love your garden. You reap what you sow. And if you sow seeds of love you’ll reap a bountiful harvest.
Happy Planting and we at Petal Pushers wish every one a great Easter Weekend!
-KA

We’re the green thumb people!

Welcome to the Petal Pushers Blog!

After writing an article on our “helpful hints” section of our website (http://www.petalpushersfarm.com/), I thought”

Why not write a blog for the garden center to help better serve our customers??

Light Bulb!

Let us know if there are any questions you have and we can answer it for you here on our blog! This way you’ll always have a record of it and can look back on it. Don’t forget to share us with your friends and like us on Facebook:

http://www.facebook.com/petalpushersfarm

We are here for all of your gardening needs.

Come on by or give us a call

Petal Pushers Farm
2635 Parade Road
Laconia NH 03246
603-524-7253

-KA 

We’re the green thumb people!

Welcome to the Petal Pushers Blog!

After writing an article on our “helpful hints” section of our website (http://www.petalpushersfarm.com/), I thought”

Why not write a blog for the garden center to help better serve our customers??

Light Bulb!

Let us know if there are any questions you have and we can answer it for you here on our blog! This way you’ll always have a record of it and can look back on it. Don’t forget to share us with your friends and like us on Facebook:

http://www.facebook.com/petalpushersfarm

We are here for all of your gardening needs.

Come on by or give us a call

Petal Pushers Farm
2635 Parade Road
Laconia NH 03246
603-524-7253

-KA